Category Archives: Eastern and Western European States, USA, Canada

Informal Deal for EU Short-Stay Visas

The EU will simplify procedures for requesting and issuing short-stay visas and will use the visa policy to encourage non-EU countries to cooperate on migration. On January 29th Parliament and Council negotiators informally agreed on a new EU Visa Code, establishing the procedures and conditions for issuing visas for short periods (up to 90 days in any 180-day period). The visa fee will rise from 60 to 80€, with some exceptions and reductions (children, students). Applications could be submitted earlier than now – between six months and 15 days ahead of the trip. Additional facilities are planned for well-known artists and high performance athletes touring in the EU, as well as multiple entry visas for frequent travelers.
The informal deal will now be put to vote in the Civil Liberties Committee. It will also need to be confirmed by the plenary before formal adoption by the Council of Ministers. The changes will be applicable six months after the text is published in the Official Journal of the EU.

Source: European Parliament, see also the text of the proposal of the European Commission from March 14, 2018

 

Visa denied for Congolese dancers

The premiere of the new creation Histoire(s) du Théâtre II by the Congolese choreographer/director Faustin Linyekula at the NTGent (Belgium), scheduled for February 21, has been canceled. Despite all efforts, the European borders remained closed for three Congolese dancers. Together with directors of the festivals and theatres which were booked for the upcoming tour, Faustin Linyekula (photo) and Milo Rau, artistic director NT Gent, have published an open letter: “Making international artistic cooperation impossible. Is this what we want?”

 

Croatian Case Studies in Eastern European Context

Darko Lukić is a theatre scholar, playwright and novelist. He hold the keynote on recent cases in Eastern Europe at the public symposium “The Challenges of Artistic Freedom” at the Maribor Festival, on October 23, 2018, organised by ACAR with the ITI centres of Slovenia and Germany.
You may read “Degenerate Art” 81 Years after Munich – Eastern European contemporary examples here.

Israel demands Germany to defund NGOs, the Berlin Berlinale Film Festival and the Jewish Museum in Berlin

An official seven page letter from mid September, sent by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s office to Chancellor Angelika Merkel, was published on December 6. The letter demanded Germany to cut its funding of the Jewish Museum in Berlin over the exhibition, Welcome to Jerusalem, since it “presents a Muslim-Palestinian perspective of the city”. The museum’s main exhibition is running since December 2017. The Jewish Museum said in a statement that “We believe open dialogue on controversial issues is crucial to allow (the museum’s) visitors to form their own position on the matter and judge it for themselves.”

Also listed are 12 NGOs and culture organizations, initiatives and institutions that Israel demands Germany fiscally divest from, including the Berlin International Film Festival (the Berlinale), exchange and funding programmes from the German Foreign Ministry, Women Wage Peace, Action Medeor, the Catholic Relief Services, and the Israeli opinion and news website +972 Magazine, which receives funding from the Heinrich Böll Foundation (politically associated with the German Green Party). The letter urges Germany to “review its funding guidelines” for organizations that are involved in “anti-Israeli propaganda” or endorse the anti-Israeli BDS movement (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions).

Sources: Die Tageszeitung (TAZ) December 6, 2018; Hyperallergic.com; Haaretz.comynetnews.com ; Sueddeutsche Zeitung, December 19, 2018

Fly The Flag for Human Rights

For a campaign of arts organisations and human rights charities to mark the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, artist Ai Weiwei has created a flag to celebrate universal human rights in UK. On 24 — 30 June 2019 schools and organisations are called “to celebrate that human rights are for everyone, every day.”

The website offers tutorials and information material for schools.

Cultural Loyalty Bill in Israel – temporary stopped

Some 1,000 Israelis turned out for the Oct. 27 demonstration in Tel Aviv against proposed legislation known as the “Loyalty in Culture” law.
Minister of Culture and Sports Miri Regev plans a cultural loyalty bill that would allow to cut state funding to cultural institutions which violate the so-called Nakba Law. The Nakba Law authorises Israel’s finance minister to revoke funding from institutions that reject Israel’s character as a “Jewish state” or mark the country’s Independence Day as a day of mourning. In fact, every one of the 98 requests to enforce the Nakba Law submitted in the past year were rejected by the Finance Ministry’s legal adviser, including 17 requests that came from the Culture Ministry. The Cultural Loyalty Bill would transfer the authority to revoke government funding to cultural institutions tot the Ministry of Culture and Sports. Regev would have the power to cut a quarter, a third and even half the budget of every Israeli theater. In Israel, with its relatively small culture market, survival hinges on government funds.
Speaking at the protest, actress, dancer and choreographer Renana Raz said “The desire to tame the art in law is so foolish, but more than that is also evil and even more than that – it is doomed to failure. Because to want loyalty in culture is to change the DNA of art, of creativity, of life.”

Sources: Al Monitor: Israel’s ‘Loyalty in Culture’ law spreads to other ministries (November 8), Israeli artists campaign against ‘Loyalty in Culture’ law (October 30); Haarez: Regev’s Loyalty Law (November 12); Jerusalem Post: HUNDREDS PROTEST ‘CULTURAL LOYALTY BILL’ IN TEL AVIV (November 12)

UPDATE: Scheduled for final vote on Monday November 26, the bill has been removed for an indefinite time from the Knesset agenda.  (Sources: Deutsche Welle, Jerusalem Post)